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Munich’s Treasures

Every year Munich attracts millions of visitors – particularly during the famous beer festival
in fall, the Oktoberfest, the city is bursting at the seams. But beyond the festival site and the
Hofbräuhaus brewery, the city also has a variety of historical, scenic, architectural, and cultural
highlights to offer. Testimonies to Munich’s eventful past can be seen almost everywhere in the
city; and wherever you are, there is a charming little anecdote or incident to go with it, that
brings Munich and its unmistakable character to life. A guided city tour is highly recommended
and is a lot of fun!

 
 
Old and New Pinakothek

Old and New Pinakothek

The Old Pinakothek is one of the most significant and time-honored painting galleries in the world and exhibits paintings from the Middle Ages to the mid-18th century. As well as works from the Classicist period, the New Pinakothek also houses exhibits from the Romantic, Art Nouveau and Impressionist periods.

 
 
Old South Cemetery (Alter Südfriedhof)

Old South Cemetery (Alter Südfriedhof)

The Old South Cemetery was established in 1563 by Duke Albrecht V. and originally served the purpose of a plague cemetery outside the city. No one is buried here anymore: It is now used by local residents as a peaceful park with lots of trees and age-old gravestones. Picture: Tanja Ritter / Pixelio

 
 
Old Town Hall (Altes Rathaus)

Old Town Hall (Altes Rathaus)

The Old Town Hall looks back on an eventful history: It has been redesigned several times and was almost completely destroyed during the Second World War. During its reconstruction, the preservationists returned it to its original Gothic style from the 15th century. Today the tower houses a historical toy museum. Picture: Hartmut910 / Pixelio

 
 
Asam Church (Asamkirche)

Asam Church (Asamkirche)

The late Baroque Asam Church (which is officially known as St. Johann Nepomuk) was constructed in the period from 1733 to 1746 by the Asam brothers and is regarded as one of the most significant buildings of the late Baroque period in southern Germany. The church is integrated into the row of houses on Sendlinger Straße. Picture: Heiko / Pixelio

 
 
House of Art Museum (Das Haus der Kunst)

House of Art Museum (Das Haus der Kunst)

The Haus der Kunst is one of the world’s significant exhibition houses. It shows retrospectives of contemporary artists or theme-related exhibitions and also offers a program for young art lovers. Hitler laid the foundation stone on October 15, 1933. Picture: Wikipedia.org

 
 
Court Garden at Odeonsplatz (Der Hofgarten am Odeonsplatz)

Court Garden at Odeonsplatz (Der Hofgarten am Odeonsplatz)

It was created between 1613 and 1617 under Maximilian I., Elector of Bavaria, as an Italian-style Renaissance garden. The Diana Temple, where concerts are held or dancers meet, is located in the center. Wall paintings in the arcade depict events from the history of the House of Wittelsbach. Picture: Michaela Schüllhorn / Pixelio

 
 
German Museum (Deutsches Museum)

German Museum (Deutsches Museum)

The German Museum is the world’s largest museum of technology and science, and the most visited museum in Germany. Around 28,000 science and technology items are exhibited here on an area of 50,000 square meters. Picture: Maria Lanznaster / Pixelio

 
 
English Garden

English Garden

The English Garden, designed by landscape gardener Friedrich Ludwig von Sckell, is one of the largest inner city parks in the world (3.75 square kilometers) – and here you will also find the “Chinesischer Turm” (Chinese Tower) and “Seehaus” (Lake House) beer gardens, walking trails, grassy fields, and the Eisbach stream with its famous surfers. Picture: Marco Barnebeck(Telemarco) / Pixelio

 
 
Field Marshal’s Hall (Feldherrnhalle)

Field Marshal’s Hall (Feldherrnhalle)

The Feldherrnhalle monument was built from 1841 to 1844 by Friedrich von Gärtner at the behest of King Ludwig I. based on the example of the Loggia dei Lanzi in Florence. After the crushed uprising on November 9, 1923 by Adolf Hitler’s followers, the hall gained notoriety as a cult site of the National Socialist movement. Picture: Marco Barnebeck(Telemarco) / Pixelio

 
 
Church of Our Lady (Frauenkirche)

Church of Our Lady (Frauenkirche)

The Cathedral of Our Dear Lady (Dom zu Unserer Lieben Frau), or Frauenkirche for short, is a late Gothic brick building with two onion domes – and is Munich’s landmark. In the entrance you will spot the Devil’s Footstep, which is shrouded in mystery. The royal crypt containing the grave of Emperor Ludwig the Bavarian (1282–1347) is also worth seeing. Picture: Richard / Pixelio

 
 
Isar Gate (Isartor)

Isar Gate (Isartor)

The Isar Gate was built in 1337 and is almost fully intact. It houses the Valentin Karlstadt Museum, in memory of the two legendary Munich comedians. Three important main roads that branch off from here make the Isartorplatz (Isar Gate Square) a traffic junction. Picture: H.La. / Pixelio

 
 
National Theater (Nationaltheater)

National Theater (Nationaltheater)

The Nationaltheater was commissioned by King Maximilian I. Joseph and was designed by architect Karl von Fischer in 1818, based on the design of a Greek temple. Today it is the venue of the Bavarian State Opera and the Bavarian State Ballet. Picture: Florentine / Pixelio

 
 
New Town Hall (Neues Rathaus)

New Town Hall (Neues Rathaus)

Whenever the figures in the famous glockenspiel in the tower of the New Town Hall come out to dance, hundreds of pairs of eyes stare upwards in amazement. The building is the seat of the Lord Mayor, city council, and municipal authorities. The traditional Ratskeller tavern is housed in its cellar vaults. Picture: Michaela Schöllhorn / Pixelio

 
 
Sendling Gate (Sendlinger Tor)

Sendling Gate (Sendlinger Tor)

A second city fortification was built under Emperor Ludwig the Bavarian between 1285 and 1337 and as a part of it, the Sendling Gate was built. The square in front of it has seen the arrival of shops, gastronomy, and a meanwhile almost century-old cinema. A popular Christmas market is held here in the run up to Christmas. Picture: Ingrid Ruthe / Pixelio

 
 
Theatine Church (Theatinerkirche) of St. Cajetan

Theatine Church (Theatinerkirche) of St. Cajetan

The Catholic abbey church of St. Cajetan at Odeonsplatz, known as the Theatine Church, is the first church north of the Alps to be built in the style of the Italian late Baroque period. The mighty construction with its yellow Rococo façade houses the Wittelsbach crypt. Picture: Birgit Winter / Pixelio

 
 
Bavaria

Bavaria

This 18-meter high Bavaria statue is the feminine symbol and worldly patron of Bavaria and stands on a hill, presiding over the Theresienwiese, the site of the annual Oktoberfest beer festival. Inside her head is a viewing platform with two benches – from here you can enjoy fantastic views of the city or the hustle and bustle of the Oktoberfest. Picture: skyrat / Pixelio

 
 
Hofbräuhaus am Platzl

Hofbräuhaus am Platzl

The Hofbräuhaus am Platzl beer hall is one of the most renowned institutions in the city. Duke Wilhelm V. commissioned its construction in 1589 for the personal use of the Wittelsbach court. The cross vault, “the Schwemme”, is the heart of the building. The inner courtyard with its beer garden is the perfect place to enjoy a “Maß” of chilled beer. Picture: Jürgen Heimerl / Pixelio

 
 
Karlsplatz (Stachus)

Karlsplatz (Stachus)

The Karlsplatz square, which is actually in the shape of a semicircle, was designed by Karl von Fischer based on the Acropolis in Athens. In 1792 it was named “Karlstor” after Elector Karl Theodor of Bavaria, but due to his unpopularity among the townsfolk, they simply named the square “Stachus”, after an inn located there. Picture: Peter von Bechen / Pixelio

 
 
Königsplatz

Königsplatz

The green Königsplatz square is part of the overall ensemble of the Brienner Straße, Munich’s first grand boulevard. Based on the Acropolis in Athens, it was designed by Karl von Fischer. Cultural events frequently take place here in summer. Picture: Alexander Hauk / Pixelio

 
 
Oktoberfest

Oktoberfest

The Oktoberfest (or “Wiesn”, from the word “Wiese” meaning meadow) has been taking place on the Theresienwiese since 1810, and with around 6 million visitors every year, it is one of the biggest public festivals in the world. As well as the festival tents and fairground rides, the highlights include the parade of the beer tent landlords, the traditional costume and marksmen’s parade, and the concert with all of the Wiesn brass bands. Picture: Karl Stuelpner / Pixelio

 
 
Pinakothek der Moderne

Pinakothek der Moderne

The Pinakothek der Moderne incorporates four museums (art, graphics, architecture, design) and is regarded worldwide as one of the biggest museums of 20th and 21st century art. Works by Beckmann, Kandinsky, Marc, Macke, Klee, Magritte, and Picasso are exhibited here. Picture: Rufus46 / Wikipedia

 
 
Viktualienmarkt

Viktualienmarkt

The Viktualienmarkt is a permanent market in Munich’s Old Town that is open daily (except for Sundays and public holidays). Locals and tourists come together here to enjoy a bite to eat, buy delicacies from all corners of the globe, or simply to enjoy the sunshine. Picture: Mario Copa / Pixelio

 
 

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